Do Due Diligence – “High Availability” isn’t a guarantee anywhere, even the Cloud

I read a great blog post this morning from Gareth Llewellyn on his Networks Are Made of String blog:

http://blog.networksaremadeofstring.co.uk/2012/07/01/i-build-high-availability-platforms-so-cloud-is-not-for-me/

Everyone out there who’s been indulging in the cloud Kool-aid proffered by so many vendors these days as the key to solving all of one’s traditional IT problems and challenges should take a look at this post. The bottom line is that infrastructure is infrastructure. All the traditional rules that IT folks have had to consider for as long as man has been computing still apply. Just because your workloads move to the “cloud” doesn’t mean they are magically immune to logical or literal failures in the underlying architecture, no matter where it is. A power failure, a poor redundancy design, errors in clustering or failover algorithms, packets having to travel at the speed of light and no faster – all things that still exist whether your workloads live on AWS, EC2, Azure, wherever. Certainly you are buying peace of mind that the folks at your x-aaS provider have built for availability and have taken some of your worries away because it’s their guys (or gals) lifting tiles, editing elasticity configs, or testing UPS power, but having all of that doesn’t absolve you of the responsibility to consider the “what-if’s” of cloud platform failures and how those affect your business processes. We’re all still playing the same game in managing infrastructure, it’s just a matter of who’s field we play on and whether our players are franchised to ourselves or are free agents that we might trade or exchange as our needs and strategies evolve and change…

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